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WOMEX 2012: The dialogue (and music love) continues

Tastes differ, and ideas about music differ. Here's a snapshot thread, giving you an overview of the bands and concepts people are discussing after the huge annual gathering of the globalistas called WOMEX.

Draw your own conclusions; check out the videos below, along with our short and sweet impressions (in no particular order).

DakhaBrakha (acoustic contemporary Ukrainian tribal space age mix of drums, songs, and cello, and the occasional siren, but not many other electronics)
a. (produced)
b. (live)

Geomungo Factory (ethereal and percussive sounding Korean string ensemble)
a. (produced)
b. (live)

Mokoomba (a crowd favorite alternating between tight and groovy Zimbabwean melodies and a very original sound that also had a soft side led by an amazing male singer with e energetic dance moves)
a. (produced)
b. (live)

Hysni Zela & Albanian Iso-Polyphonic Choir (complex, trance-y, polyphonic vocal music)
a. (live)

Jungle By Night (tight afrobeat from the Netherlands, with solos stretching far beyond the youthful band's years)
a. (produced)
b. (live)

Graveola e o Lixo Polifonico (Brazilian indie rock, with quirky twists and turns and some bad-ass clarinet)
a. (produced)
b. (live)

Boban and Marko Markovic (the monsters/masters of Balkan brass)
a. (produced)
b. (live)


Lindingo (upbeat polyrhythms, sweet Indian Ocean melodies, crowd-engaging singer)
a. video

Canalon de Timbiqui (Afro-Colombian percussion, marimba, and vocals, beautiful women singers)
a. (produced)
b. (live)

Mama Marjas (quirky but solid southern Italian dancehall reggae, with a deep voice which could be mistaken for a Jamaican man, but it's a woman)
a. (produced)
b. (live)

Sam Lee (stunning English folk singer with "indie" leanings, and tasteful lush arrangements on strings, trumpet, tabla, koto, ukulele, shruti box)
a. (produced)
b. (live)


Terakaft (Tuareg desert blues)
a. (produced)
b. (live)

Axel Krygier (different every minute but one moment was heavy metal Devo with electrified cumbia, but in a good way)
a. (produced)
b. (live)

Raza Khan (unpredictable qawwali/Sufi singer that sounds traditional until you listen deeply)
a. (produced)
b. (live)

Anibal Velasquez y us Conjunto (rapid fire accordion-driven guaracha and Musica Tropical with supertight percussion and visually delightful band made up with guys you wish were your crazy uncles.)
a. (produced)
b. (live)

Le Sahel (supergroup reunion of mbalax pioneers reflect their original era with Santana-like ambience, and an off-the-chart organ soloist not to be missed, very danceable)
a. (produced)
b. (live)

Canzoniere Grecanico Salentino (traditional Pizzica music and dance)
a. (produced)
b. (live)

A Tribe Called Red (Powwow drum for the modern dancefloor with an unexpected combination of the freshest beats, Native song, and visuals, mixed with other club sounds)
a. (produced)
b. (track)

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